Artist Studies

ARTIST STUDIES

By studying and analyzing the greatest improvisers on the planet, you will learn things that can not be learned any other way.

The real object of practicing these lessons is not to sound exactly like the artist you’re studying, but to expand your musical vocabulary, and your ability to absorb and execute musical ideas.

You will soon experience that once you get familiar with learning like this, it will get a lot easier! The things that are hard to begin with, like getting the rhythms and phrasing right, will get much easier, really fast, probably much faster than you would have thought.

Be advised – In music, like in any art, to be able to say anything relevant, we’re dependent of standing on the shoulders of those before us.

IMPORTANT:
Some of the analysis in this section is very advanced. If there are things you don’t understand, don’t worry too much about it! Actually learning to PLAY the musical examples is FAR more important than understanding all of the theory!! And vice versa – JUST understanding the theory will do you no good if you don’t actually learn to play the music.

Keep it simple:
1. Learn the melodic ideas.
2. See if you can use those ideas, or bits of them, in your own improvised soloing.


CLASSIC JAZZ GUITAR

PAT MARTINO

– There is a kind of “clarity” in the lines of Pat Martino that I think make them ideal for the jazz student. For scale based ideas, his playing is a deep well of inspiration, there is always something cool there – an unexpected note slightly outside the key, or a hip rhythmic element. Check out his debut record “El Hombre”. He was 22 when he made that (!!!)

Pat Martino on “Impressions”
Another eye-opener lesson (studying the lines of Pat Martino will do just that!). We’re picking a part four 8-bar chunks from Pat Martino’s solo on “Impressions” by John Coltrane. Incredibly useful jazz vocabulary that you can build on in your own playing.

Pat Martino on “Blue Bossa”
Classic jazz guitar vocabulary by Pat Martino, and scale options for “Blue Bossa”

Pat Martino Licks
4 licks in the style of Pat Martino.

JOE PASS

– The elegant playing of Joe Pass is some of the most talked about and studied in the jazz guitar world. Here are some really sweet examples that you can add to your musical vocabulary.

Joe Pass On “On A Clear Day” 1
One whole round of Joe Pass’ solo on “On A Clear Day”. This lesson will most likely be a jazz-guitar-eye-opener, as you’ll see how Joe Pass creates some fantastic lines, and great tonalities basically just by circling around one basic “position”.

Joe Pass On “On A Clear Day” 2
Here we play around with one of the melodic ideas from Joe Pass’ solo on “On A Clear Day” on a more modern sounding track. It’s easy to learn and use, and sounds sweet.

Joe Pass on “Joe’s Blues” 1
Nice, elegant bluesy jazz licks from Joe Pass’ solo on “Joe’s Blues”.

Joe Pass on “Joe’s Blues” 2
Lesson on Joe Pass’ chord solo work from his solo on “Joe’s Blues”, as well as some really nice single note lines.

GEORGE BENSON

– One of my absolute favorites, George Benson! Here you will find lessons highlighting both his straight ahead bluesy playing, the hot bebop playing, the chord soloing, and the funky fusion stuff. Everything so unmistakably BENSON!

George Benson Octaves + 5ths and 4ths
An early trademark of George Benson was to put a note in between the Wes Montgomery octaves, either a 4th or 5th. In this lesson you get a few cool ways of using this idea.

George Benson on “I Remember Wes”
In these 4 lessons we first look at what George Benson play on the actual recording (We go through the guitar part for the entire song), both melody, chord melody and soloing. Then we pick out selected parts from the solo, and look at how you can start using those ideas in your own soloing.

George Benson on “Clockwise”
Incredible bebop lines by George Benson on this 12 bar blues, both bluesy and outside.

George Benson on “Billies Bounce”
In these lessons we study a large chunk of George Benson’s legendary solo on “Billie’s Bounce”, and look closer on some of the most incredible licks there, and how to use them in our own soloing.

George Benson on “The Ghetto”
Here are a few examples of George Benson playing “inside”. Nice bluesy ideas that doesn’t create very much tonal tension, but still are solid melodic statements!

George Benson on “Weekend in L.A.”
In these lessons we look at the more funky side of Benson, with some his great “pocket” playing on “Weekend in L.A.” There’s also some great melodic ideas for 11 and dom7 chords, as well as some of the George Benson signature triplet runs.

George Benson On “From Now On”
Learn George Benson’s beautiful solo guitar instrumental “From Now On”.

KENNY BURRELL

The bluesy and strong melodic style of Kenny Burrell is really fun to explore, and in these lessons you’ll find some fantastic cool jazz-blues vocabulary that is instantly recognizable classic jazz guitar.

Kenny Burrell on “Midnight Blue”
Incredible bluesy jazz guitar ideas from Kenny Burrell from his solo on “Midnight Blue”!

Kenny Burrell on “Kenny’s Theme” 1
The beginning of Kenny’s solo on this song, and one of his phrases transposed to different chords and on different string groups so that it fits the entire 12 bar jazz blues form. Very useful jazz blues melodic idea – classic jazz guitar.

Kenny Burrell on “Kenny’s Theme” 2
12 bars of Kenny Burrell’s solo on “Kenny’s theme” transcribed.

Kenny Burrell on “Kenny’s Theme” 3
12 new bars of Kenny’s solo, the “shout chorus” on guitar. Fantastic soloing ideas with two part harmony throughout, and Kenny demonstrates what a true virtuoso he is.

JIM HALL

Jim Hall on “Alone Together”
3 great melodic devices played by Jim Hall on his solo on “Alone Together”.

WES MONTGOMERY

Wes Montgomery, the TITAN of jazz guitar, instantly recognizable for his sound, and a master at single-line solos, octave solos, and chord solos (More often than not in that order within the same solo).

Wes Montgomery on “Four on Six” 1
Wes Montgomery’s “Four on Six”, what scales to use, and some melodic ideas.

Wes Montgomery on “Four on Six” 2
First 10 bars of Wes Montgomery’s solo on “Four on Six”. 3 clear and usable ideas including use of double stops, arpeggios and a sequenced melodic idea using some very intricate rhythms.

Wes Montgomery on “Four on Six” 3
Next 8 bars of Wes’ solo on Four on Six. One lick using the whole tone scale, one altered line, and one line using a natural 6th tension.

Wes Montgomery On “Road Song” 1
The first bars from Wes’ solo on “Road Song”. Some fantastic melodic ideas, and an example on how simplifying the solo scales on complex changes can make really hip tonalities. Make sure to practice with the practice tracks to work on your phrasing.

Wes Montgomery On “Road Song” 2
The next bars from Wes’ solo on “Road Song” (Second A part). More fantastic melodic ideas, great idea for minor II – V – I (Altered), nice arpeggios, phrasing details, and great bluesy line. Make sure to practice with the practice tracks to work on your phrasing.

Wes Montgomery On “Road Song” 3
Incredible line from the B section of the song. Arpeggio idea approached by a half tone below, moving all over the place.

Wes Montgomery On “Airegin” 1
First 8 bars of Wes’ solo on Airegin, from the record “The incredible jazz guitar of Wes Montgomery”. Use of pentatonic blues scales from the root of each chord, as well as chromatic passing notes, and diminished scale on the dominant 7 chord.

Wes Montgomery On “Airegin” 2
Bars 9-20 of Wes’ solo on Airegin, from the record “The incredible jazz guitar of Wes Montgomery”. Rapidly modulating 2-5-1 changes, use of pentatonic blues scales from the 2 degree of the progressions, upper structure arpeggios, chromatic passing notes, and more.

Wes Montgomery On “Airegin” 3
Last part of the first chorus of Wes’ solo on Airegin, from the record “The incredible jazz guitar of Wes Montgomery”.


MODERN JAZZ GUITAR

PAT METHENY

Pat Metheny on “Third Wind” 1
First 8 bars of Pat Metheny’s solo on “Third Wind” from the live record “The Road to You”.

Pat Metheny on “Third Wind” 2
Next 4 bars from Pat Metheny’s solo on “Third Wind” from the live record “The Road to You”.

Pat Metheny on “Third Wind” 3 – The Solo Break
Pat Metheny’s classic solo break on “Third Wind” from the live record “The Road to You”.

Pat Metheny on “Bright Size Life”
One phrase from Pat Metheny’s solo on “Bright Size Life” from the “TRIO->LIVE” CD, spanning several positions. Also the corresponding pentatonic scales in all those positions.

Pat Metheny’s Tritone Sub Triads
Simple idea from Pat Metheny to create a cool tritone sub sound with triads.

Pat Metheny’s “Antonia”
Lesson on how to solo over the solo section to the tune “Antonia”, by Pat Metheny (From the “Secret Story” album).

MIKE STERN

Mike Stern On “Gossip”
Overview of tune structure, and two killer melodic ideas!

Mike Stern on “Gossip” 2
Fantastic melodic lines from Mike Stern on the B section of “Gossip”, using arpeggios, diminished, pentatonic and chromatic ideas.

Mike Stern on “Gossip” 3
More melodic lines from the B section of “Gossip”. Mike Stern’s signature “inside to outside” melodic ideas.

Mike Stern Hot Licks
One long line by Mike Stern, containing several cool little ideas using chromatics, and superimposing major on minor. Very nice and easy to use.

Mike Stern’s Whole Tone Chromatics
Very simple and super easy idea taken from Mike Stern to create a whole tone sound, and play it over a minor chord vamp.

JOHN SCOFIELD

John Scofield on “Groove Elation”
One round of John Scofield’s solo on “Groove Elation” (12 bar blues form). Learn a couple of his super-cool signature melodic devices, really easy to start using in your own soloing!

John Scofield on “Twang” 1
First 8 bars of John Scofield’s solo on “Twang”. Easy to play technically, but a real challenge to play with Sco’s feel and timing! A couple of very typical things in the quirky style of John Scofield.

John Scofield on “Twang” 2
3 snippets from John Scofield’s solo on “Twang”. More double stops, as well as a very cool single line with a lot of chromatic tension.

MORTEN FAERESTRAND

Dragracer
“Dragracer” is an original composition by Morten Faerestrand. Play-a-long track for performing the piece, with and without melody.

Bopfirmation Licks
Guitar friendly Charlie-Parker-like licks that you can use on 2-5’s.

The Outro-Video Solo Transcribed
I’ve had many requests to do a lesson on this solo, so here it finally is.

Solo Transcription: Stepping outside the blues box
Here’s a solo I did for a YouTube lesson transcribed.

Soloing on 2-5-1 in F Major
Transcription of an improfised solo on a simple 2-5-1 in F Major.

Intro Solo from the Half Sweep Lesson
Transcribed solo from a lesson on “half-sweeps”

Blues Not
Original composition. How to play it, and how to solo on it.

SCOTT HENDERSON

Scott Henderson on “Got A Match”
Scott Henderson soloing on Chick Corea Electric band’s “Got A Match”

Scott Henderson on “Bofat” 1
Two very cool licks from Scott Henderson’s solo on “Bofat”.

Scott Henderson on “Bofat” 2
More soloing from Scott Henderson on “Bofat”, altered dominant to major triad, and minor blues licks with very cool color notes! Technically very challenging lesson.

Scott Henderson on “Bofat” 3
Bluesy, outside, and chromatic ideas from Scott Henderson on his solo on “Bofat”.

Scott Henderson on “Renegade” 1
First 8 bars of Scott Henderson’s solo on “Renegade” from the classic Tribal Tech album “Nomad”. Use of melodic minor, and outside tonalities.

Scott Henderson on “Renegade” 2
Next 8 bars of Scott Henderson’s solo on “Renegade”.

Scott Henderson on “Renegade” 3
Two very cool, and easy-to-use ideas from Scott Henderson’s solo on “Renegade”.


BLUES / FUSION

JEFF BECK

Jeff Beck on “Cause we’ve ended as lovers” 1
The basic melody and chords of Jeff Beck’s version of “Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers”

Jeff Beck on “Cause we’ve ended as lovers” 2
Discussion about Jeff Beck’s tone, and how to get a nice, fat lead tone with single coils.

Jeff Beck on “Cause we’ve ended as lovers” 3
Soloing options for the solo changes of Jeff Beck’s version of the song. Scales and arpeggios.

Jeff Beck on “Cause we’ve ended as lovers” 4
Here’s a few of Jeff Beck’s signature licks and tricks from the original recording of “Cause we’we ended as lovers”

LARRY CARLTON

Larry Carlton on “Room 335″
The hippest playing from Larry Carlton’s hit tune “Room 335”

Smooth & Bluesy
Bluesy jazz track in the style of early Larry Carlton. Short, and with a very clear dynamic structure, great for practicing the skill of sounding almost like you’re playing a composition, even though you are improvising!

ROBBEN FORD

Robben Ford On “Man In The Moon”
Here’s a technical run trough and harmonic analysis of 4 bars of Robben Ford’s solo on “Man In The Moon”. It’s a good example of the jazzy blues style of Robben Ford, where he’s playing real fluid and elegant lines, that has a slight touch of colorful jazz notes, while still being strongly rooted in the blues.

Robben Ford on “Revelation”
Cool jazzy blues licks by Robben Ford on the song “Revelation”.


LEARN FROM OTHER INSTRUMENTS

PIANO

KENNY KIRKLAND

Kenny Kirkland from “Bring On The Night” (Sting)
Study of Kenny Kirkland’s solo from the opening track to Sting’s double live CD “Bring On The Night”.

CHICK COREA

Chick Corea on “The Wish”
This lesson is from Chick Corea’s piano solo on “The Wish”. Triad ideas and chromatic approach ideas, as well as an altered scale run.

Chick Corea on “Matrix” 1
Some incredible lines from Chick Corea from his piano solo on “Matrix”, which is a fast blues in F.

Chick Corea on “Matrix” 2
More incredible lines from Chick Corea from his piano solo on “Matrix”

Chick Corea On “Matrix” 3
Spin-off from an earlier lesson on Chick Corea’s solo on “Matrix”. In this lesson one of his patterns is explored and expanded.

Chick Corea On “Bessie’s Blues” 1
Here’s a special two-hand trill (from piano) by Chick Corea, as well as some nice lines using blues scale, diminished half-whole, fourth voicing chords, and a very technically challengin (and rhytmically challenging!) chromatically moving idea.

Chick Corea On “Bessie’s Blues” 2
Chick Corea playing around with small arpeggios,scale based runs and chromatics. Clear Coltrane referances.

Chick Corea On “Got a Match” 1
Melodic idea from “Got a Match” adapted and applied to both major and minor II – V – I. Includes superimposing a major scale over the II chord and a lot of chromaticism.

Chick Corea On “Got a Match” 2
Soloing ideas from Chick Corea’s solo on “Got a Match”. Use of pentatonics, rhythmic displacement, outside playing, chromatisism and altered tonality.


SAXOPHONE

BOB BERG

Bob Berg on “The Wish” 1
Some incredible melodic content by Bob Berg played on “The Wish”, by Chick Corea, jumping from triad to triad, inside and outside, seamlessly integrating pentatonics and chromaticism.

Bob Berg on “The Wish” 2
Fantastic pentatonic ideas from Bob Berg.

MICHAEL BRECKER

Michael Brecker – Intensity Building 5 Note Pattern
Five note pattern adapted from one of Michael Breacker’s signature licks. Great for building tension, and for moving around chromatically.

KENNY GARRETT

Kenny Garrett on “Pursuance”
Several rounds of Kenny Garrett’s solo on “Pursuance”, some REALLY great melodic ideas.


BASS

TAL WILKENFIELD

Tal Wilkenfield on “Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers” 1
This is Tal Wilkenfield’s bass solo from a live performance with the Jeff Beck group, part 1.

Tal Wilkenfield on “Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers” 2
This is Tal Wilkenfield’s bass solo from a live performance with the Jeff Beck group, part 2.